Time to Spring Forward! Daylight Saving Time Starts this Sunday at 2 a.m. 148

Tomorrow, Sunday, March 10th, clocks will be set forward one hour, indicating the beginning of Daylight Saving Time (DST) for much of the country.

The spring forward shifts additional daylight into the evening.  The time change doesn’t happen at midnight like some expect, instead it happens at 2 A.M. when most people are in bed. This was done to try to cause minimal disruption and confusion. By waiting until 2 A.M. to give or take an hour it prevents the date from switching.  It is also when the fewest trains are running, before most early shift workers leave for work, and most bars and restaurants are already closed.

DST has been widely accepted across the country, but it’s not mandated by federal law and is not observed nationwide.  If you really cant stand springing forward and falling back each year you may consider moving to Arizona who has opted out since 1968. Arizona summers are very hot, and an earlier sunset gives residents more time to enjoy tolerable temperatures before bed. Hawaii also opts out, given Hawaii’s latitude it doesn’t see a noticeable daylight hour difference between winter and summer months so extending daylight wouldn’t make much difference.

Where did this Daylight Saving Time originate?  Benjamin Franklin introduced the concept in 1784 after visiting Paris stating that longer daylight hours would save on candle use. The first documented written proposal for Daylight Savings Time was put forward by William Willett in 1907.  Willett argued that we were wasting important daylight by rising at the same time in the summer as we did throughout the winter months.  In 1916, Germany was first to adopt the idea to attempt to conserve coal during World War I, then Britain, along with many other European nations, followed suit. It wasn’t until 1918 that the time change spread to the U.S..  When the first time Daylight Saving was instituted year-round in the US, it was called “War Time”. Time zones were called “Eastern War Time”, “Central War Time”, and “Pacific War Time”.  After the surrender of Japan in mid-August 1945, the time zones were relabeled “Eastern Peace Time”, “Central Peace Time” and “Pacific Peace Time”.  Most countries, including the U.S., ceased official observation of the switch following wartime. Daylight Saving Time was re-introduced in the US in the beginning of 1974 to save energy.  At the time, the US was in the middle of a nationwide energy crisis and the government was looking for ways to reduce public consumption.

Even though Daylight Saving Time was implemented to save fuel, there is no actual evidence that DST reduces energy use.  While it’s true that changing the clocks can save residents money on lighting, the cost of heating and air conditioning tends to increase. That extra hour of daylight is only beneficial when people are willing to go outside to enjoy it. It’s probably fair to say that especially in today’s world, energy-wise, it’s pretty much a wash.

Daylight Saving Time has been a topic of debate in our country for decades not only because of its questionable effect on energy conservation, but also because of its impact on the agriculture, hospitality and retail industries as well as human health.

Most health professionals feel DST should be abolished or implemented year-round.  They feel the change is it is disruptive to our bodies, especially in the Spring when we “lose” and hour.  Studies show that the extra hour of sleep we lose by springing ahead can have an adverse impact on our overall health.  In the days after Daylight Saving Time starts, our biological clocks are a little bit off. One hour of lost sleep may sound insignificant, but small disruptions in our sleep patterns have been shown to dull our senses and diminish our mental capacity.  An increased risk of heart attack, stroke, and susceptibility to illness have all been linked to the change in time.

Many east coast residents believe that daylight saving time shift into the evening should be extended year-round. They believe the extension would positively impact our health, economy, social lives and community.  It’s interesting to think about.  How would our patterns change, if at all? The length of light we experience each day wouldn’t change; that’s determined by our location and the tilt of Earth. However, we would experience more light during times that better accommodate our modern lives.   If daylight saving were always in effect most people argue that we could enjoy after-work light hours— and there’s a strong believe that this after-work light is worth more to us than morning light. Children get more exercise when the sun is out later and can play outside in the evening.  Adults would engage in more leisure activities after work, meet a friend for drink or be encouraged to shop a little later.

What do you think?  If you had a choice would you prefer more light hours in the morning or evening?  Well regardless of your preference, as residents of Long Island, Daylight Saving Time will begin again tomorrow.  Time will spring forward and you will be losing an hour of sleep this weekend.  Don’t forget to check your clocks to be sure they “Spring Ahead” tomorrow!

Fun Daylight Saving Time Facts:

  • Last year, DST began on March 11 and ended on Nov. 4. And this year, DST will begin on March 10 and ends on Nov. 3, 2019. You will then move your clock forward an hour on March 8, 2020, and the cycle will begin again.
  • In 1930, Stalin adopted Daylight Saving Time for Soviet Union, but he forgot to “Fall Back” and it stayed this way for the next 60 years.
  • During the 1950s and 60s, each U.S. region could begin and end Daylight Saving Time whenever they wanted. Due to widespread chaos, Congress passed the Uniform Time act of 1966, which created a standard time.
  • In 1987, Chile delayed Daylight Saving Time to accommodate a visit from the Pope. Chile also delayed switching the time in 1990 for a presidential inauguration.
  • In September 1999, daylight saving time helped prevent a terrorist bombing. When West Bank terrorists failed to realize that Israel had switched back to standard time, their bombs exploded an hour too early—killing three terrorists instead of the intended victims.
  • In 2012, a guy in Ohio was arrested twice in one day, at the exact same time, due to Daylight Saving Time
  • DST costs the U.S. billions of dollars a year in disruptions to the airline and retail industry, TV ratings and the stock market
  • A 2014 a poll found that an increasing number of Americans do not think daylight savings is worth the hassle. In 2014 33% of Americans supported the time change, down from 45% the year before.
  • Researchers found a 2% decrease in SAT scores when the tests were administered after Daylight Saving Time.
  • Surfing the web for enjoyment during work hours, increases significantly the first Monday after Daylight Saving Time begins in the spring. Researchers attributed this increase to lack of sleep and thus lack of focus and motivation.
  • Globally, about one-quarter of people in approximately 70 countries around the world implement Daylight Saving Time, though different countries change their clocks at different times. The only major industrialized countries that do not observe DST are Japan, India, and China.
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National Night Out Draws Over 1000 People 160

 On August 6th, Supervisor Ed Romaine, Councilwoman Jane Bonner and Councilman Michael Loguercio co-hosted the annual National Night Out at Fireman’s Park in Ridge. This free, annual event promotes police-community relationships and neighborhood camaraderie. It encourages adults and children to interact with members of law enforcement to help create a true sense of community. Over 1000 people joined in to play games, win prizes and interact with vendors, organizations and members of the Suffolk County Sheriff and Police Departments, firefighters and first responders. Pictured at left are (left to right) Supervisor Ed Romaine, Suffolk County Sheriff Errol Toulon, former New York Rangers hockey star Ron Duguay and Councilwoman Jane Bonner. Pictured at right are Supervisor Ed Romaine (left) and Councilman Michael Loguercio (center) with Deputies from the Suffolk County Sheriff’s Department.

Supervisor Romaine said, “I look forward to National Night Out every year. Most people don’t get to have personal contact with law enforcement, and this is a unique opportunity for them to do so in a relaxed and fun environment. I thank everyone who had a hand is organizing this event and all the residents who came out to enjoy it.”

Sheriff Toulon said, “National Night Out is one of my favorite events of the year because it highlights the ways that communities and law enforcement work together to keep our neighborhoods safe.  This year, we were so fortunate to partner with Councilwoman Jane Bonner to bring National Night Out to Fireman’s Park in Ridge, and along with Supervisor Ed Romaine and Councilman Mike Loguercio, we welcomed nearly 1000 residents of all ages.  I believe everyone had a great time and I look forward to organizing this event in Brookhaven for years to come.”

Councilwoman Bonner said, “National Night Out in the Town of Brookhaven is a great tradition and I was happy to join with Sheriff Toulon to help make this event such a big success in Ridge. It’s important that residents and law enforcement become familiar with each other so we can all work together to make Brookhaven a better place to live.”

Councilman Loguercio said, “As a member of the Ridge Fire Department myself, I understand how important it is for adults and children to get to know and trust those who are out there working every day to save lives. National Night Out is an ideal opportunity for residents to have fun and learn how they can keep themselves and their families out of harm’s way, and I look forward to coming back next year.”

 

 

Dress for Success 2nd Annual Pop-Up Sale- August 9th, 10th & 11th 108

Dress for Success Brookhaven will hold its second annual Pop-Up sale on August 9th, 10th and 11th at 70 North Main Street in Sayville during the village’s Summerfest 2019. The first Pop-Up Sale, which was held in August 2018 in Patchogue, was very successful and created more awareness for the Dress for Success programs. On sale at the Dress for Success Brookhaven Pop Up Sale will be excess inventory, including many new items of clothing, jewelry, handbags accessories and more. The sale will start with a preview sale on Friday, August 9 from 6:00 pm to 8:00 pm. It will continue Saturday, August 10 from 11:00 am to 8:00 pm and Sunday, August 11 from 11:00 am to 7:00 pm. All proceeds from the sale go directly to Dress for Success Brookhaven programs. The mission of these programs is to empower women to achieve economic independence by providing a network of support, professional attire and the development tools necessary to help women thrive in work and in life. The Dress for Success Brookhaven Pop-Up Sale is sponsored by California Closets.

About Dress for Success

Founded in New York City in 1997, Dress for Success is an international not-for-profit organization offering services designed to help clients find jobs and remain employed. Each Dress for Success client receives one suit when she has a job interview and can return when she finds work to receive a week’s worth of clothing. Brookhaven was the first affiliate to be established as part of the worldwide non-profit organization. The women we serve come from across Long Island. They are job ready women who have been referred by over 250 local non-profit organizations, including domestic violence agencies, veterans’ organizations, homeless shelters and job training programs.

Our mission is to promote the economic independence of disadvantaged women by providing attire, a network of support and the career development tools to help women thrive in work and in life. Dress for Success Brookhaven is sponsored by the Town of Brookhaven Department of Housing and Human Services, Division of Women’s Services.

The Dress for Success Boutique is located at Brookhaven Town Hall, One Independence Hill in Farmingville. It is open Monday through Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. and on selected Saturdays from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.  All client visits are by appointment only. Donations of clothing and other items can be made on Mondays from 10:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. and on the third Saturday of every month from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. For more information about Dress for Success, please call 631- 451-9127 or visit dressforsuccess.org/brookhaven.

About California Closets

California Closets of Suffolk County, NY is honored to be hosting the 2019 Dress for Success Pop Up Sale inside of our new, flagship showroom in Sayville, NY. California Closets and Dress for Success have created a successful partnership over the last 20 years to empower woman back into the workplace. Through the generous donations of California Closets clients, over 2000 pairs of professional shoes have been donated to DFS Brookhaven. California Closets designers and installers have renovated the DFS Boutique inside of the Brookhaven Town hall. The team at California Closets provided logistics support and casework to the 2018 DFS Pop Up in a space provided by Toast Coffee House in Patchogue.

Our goal at California Closets is to create a boutique shopping experience inside of our client’s homes. By teaming up with Dress for Success, shoppers will have the opportunity to browse selections of designer clothes, jewelry, handbags and accessories inside of beautiful displays of reach-in and walk-in California Closets, providing this experience to the Long Island public for the first time!   We at California Closets are excited to have you visit us, learn about our brand and products and join us in our support of Dress for Success, Brookhaven.

California Closets of Suffolk County, NY is an independently owned and operated business that has been serving Suffolk County for 34 years. California Closets is the industry innovator and leader in creating custom storage solutions for every room of the home.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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