Its Time to Fall Back! Tomorrow, Sunday November 4th Daylight Saving Time officially ends! 142

Tomorrow, Sunday, November 4, clocks will be turned back one hour, indicating the end of Daylight Saving Time (DST) for much of the country. Day Light Saving Time ends just as we start to notice the decrease in daylight hours.  The change shifts additional daylight back into the morning.  The time change doesn’t happen at midnight like some expect, instead it happens at 2 A.M. when most people are in bed. This was done to try to cause minimal disruption and confusion. By waiting until 2 A.M. to give or take an hour it prevents the date from switching.  It is also when the fewest trains are running, before most early shift workers leave for work, and most bars and restaurants are already closed.

DST has been widely accepted across the country, but it’s not mandated by federal law and is not observed nationwide.  If you really cant stand springing forward and falling back each year you may consider moving to Arizona who has opted out since 1968. Arizona summers are very hot, and an earlier sunset gives residents more time to enjoy tolerable temperatures before bed. Hawaii also opts out, given Hawaii’s latitude it doesn’t see a noticeable daylight hour difference between winter and summer months so extending daylight wouldn’t make much difference.

Where did this Daylight Saving Time originate?  Benjamin Franklin introduced the concept in 1784 after visiting Paris stating that longer daylight hours would save on candle use. The first documented written proposal for Daylight Savings Time was put forward by William Willett in 1907.  Willett argued that we were wasting important daylight by rising at the same time in the summer as we did throughout the winter months.  In 1916, Germany was first to adopt the idea to attempt to conserve coal during World War I, then Britain, along with many other European nations, followed suit. It wasn’t until 1918 that the time change spread to the U.S..  When the first time Daylight Saving was instituted year-round in the US, it was called “War Time”. Time zones were called “Eastern War Time”, “Central War Time”, and “Pacific War Time”.  After the surrender of Japan in mid-August 1945, the time zones were relabeled “Eastern Peace Time”, “Central Peace Time” and “Pacific Peace Time”.  Most countries, including the U.S., ceased official observation of the switch following wartime. Daylight Saving Time was re-introduced in the US in the beginning of 1974 to save energy.  At the time, the US was in the middle of a nationwide energy crisis and the government was looking for ways to reduce public consumption.

Even though Daylight Saving Time was implemented to save fuel, there is no actual evidence that DST reduces energy use.  While it’s true that changing the clocks can save residents money on lighting, the cost of heating and air conditioning tends to increase. That extra hour of daylight is only beneficial when people are willing to go outside to enjoy it. It’s probably fair to say that especially in today’s world, energy-wise, it’s pretty much a wash.

Daylight Saving Time has been a topic of debate in our country for decades not only because of its questionable effect on energy conservation, but also because of its impact on the agriculture, hospitality and retail industries as well as human health.

Most health professionals feel DST should be abolished or implemented year-round.  They feel the change is it is disruptive to our bodies, especially in the Spring when we “lose” and hour.  Studies show that the extra hour of sleep we lose by springing ahead can have an adverse impact on our overall health.  In the days after Daylight Saving Time starts, our biological clocks are a little bit off. One hour of lost sleep may sound insignificant, but small disruptions in our sleep patterns have been shown to dull our senses and diminish our mental capacity.  An increased risk of heart attack, stroke, and susceptibility to illness have all been linked to the change in time.

Many east coast residents believe that daylight saving time shift into the evening should be extended year-round. They believe the extension would positively impact our health, economy, social lives and community.  It’s interesting to think about.  How would our patterns change, if at all? The length of light we experience each day wouldn’t change; that’s determined by our location and the tilt of Earth. However, we would experience more light during times that better accommodate our modern lives.   If daylight saving were always in effect most people argue that we could enjoy after-work light hours— and there’s a strong believe that this after-work light is worth more to us than morning light. Children get more exercise when the sun is out later and can play outside in the evening.  Adults would engage in more leisure activities after work, meet a friend for drink or be encouraged to shop a little later.

What do you think?  If you had a choice would you prefer more light hours in the morning or evening?  Well regardless of your preference, as residents of Long Island, Daylight Saving Time will end tomorrow.  Time will be set back and you will be gaining an hour of sleep this weekend.  Don’t forget to check your clocks to be sure they “fall back” tomorrow!

FUN D.S.T. FACTS:

  • In 1930, Stalin adopted Daylight Saving Time for Soviet Union, but he forgot to “Fall Back” and it stayed this way for the next 60 years.
  • During the 1950s and 60s, each U.S. region could begin and end Daylight Saving Time whenever they wanted. Due to widespread chaos, Congress passed the Uniform Time act of 1966, which created a standard time.
  • In 1987, Chile delayed Daylight Saving Time to accommodate a visit from the Pope. Chile also delayed switching the time in 1990 for a presidential inauguration.
  • In September 1999, daylight saving time helped prevent a terrorist bombing. When West Bank terrorists failed to realize that Israel had switched back to standard time, their bombs exploded an hour too early—killing three terrorists instead of the intended victims.
  • In 2012, a guy in Ohio was arrested twice in one day, at the exact same time, due to Daylight Saving Time
  • DST costs the U.S. billions of dollars a year in disruptions to the airline and retail industry, TV ratings and the stock market
  • A 2014 a poll found that an increasing number of Americans do not think daylight savings is worth the hassle. In 2014 33% of Americans supported the time change, down from 45% the year before.
  • Researchers found a 2% decrease in SAT scores when the tests were administered after Daylight Saving Time.
  • Surfing the web for enjoyment during work hours, increases significantly the first Monday after Daylight Saving Time begins in the spring. Researchers attributed this increase to lack of sleep and thus lack of focus and motivation.
  • Globally, about one-quarter of people in approximately 70 countries around the world implement Daylight Saving Time, though different countries change their clocks at different times. The only major industrialized countries that do not observe DST are Japan, India, and China.
Previous ArticleNext Article

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Local Groundhogs Predict Early Spring 2019! 48

Happy Groundhog Day!  Rather than our traditional weathermen, today we turn the forecasting over to two resident Long Island Groundhogs – Malverne Mel, and Holtsville Hal for their Winter 2019 predictions.  We are happy to report that for the first time since 2016, both Holtsville Hal and Malverne Mel did not see their shadows this morning!  According to groundhog lore, that should mean we will be having an early spring this year.

It seems to be a unanimous decision this year, as America’s most famous groundhog, Punxsutawney Phil, as well as several other local groundhogs all predicted an early end to the polar vortex temperatures.  I addition to Mel, Hal, and Phil, Staten Island Chuck, upstate New York’s Dunkirk Dave, and Connecticut’s Chuckles all did not see their shadow early this morning.

The only dissenting groundhog this year seems to be Milltown Mel out of New Jersey, who DID see his shadow, and is predicting six-more weeks of Winter.  We will try to reach out for further comment.  However it is worth noting that human meteorologist, News 12’s Bruce Avery, agrees with Mel, saying he expects at least six more weeks of winter.

Whoever’s predictions you decide to believe, the Spring equinox is six weeks away on March 20th.

Brookhaven Town, Patchogue Village Form Joint Partnership in Seeking Additional Sewer Funds 56

Mastic Patchogue Sewers

Brookhaven Supervisor Ed Romaine and Patchogue Village Mayor Paul Pontieri today
were joined by county, town and village officials to lobby for $26.4 million in available funds to extend sewer
projects in Patchogue and in Mastic near the Forge River.

Romaine and Pontieri issued a joint letter to New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo, thanking the Governor for his
leadership in providing funding for sewers to protect Long island’s groundwater and waterways and provide an
incentive for economic development. The two officials pointed out that while residents in Mastic and Babylon
approved a recent referendum for sewer projects in their communities, residents in Great River rejected a
similar plan for their area. Romaine and Pontieri wrote in their letter that the $26.4 million earmarked for Great
River could be reallocated to Patchogue and the Mastic project, expanding the environmental and economic
benefit for those areas. Pictured left to right are Patchogue Village Superintendent of Public Works Joe Dean;
Trustees Thomas Ferb and Joseph Keyes; Deputy Mayor Jack Krieger; Mayor Pontieri; Supervisor Romaine;
Deputy Supervisor, Councilmen Dan Panico and Councilman Neil Foley.

“An effective use of the $26.4 million in funds that were rejected by Great River voters would be to partially
fund Phase 3 of the Mastic/Forge River sewer project and to expand sewers in the Village of Patchogue. These
projects are already engineered. A site for a sewage treatment plant on Town of Brookhaven land is available
for the Forge River project. Patchogue has long had its own sewage treatment plant, and both the Mastic and
Patchogue communities (Mastic in a vote just this week), have shown their support for sewers,” they wrote in
the letter.

Supervisor Romaine said, “I commend the residents who voted overwhelmingly to fund Phase 1 and 2 of the
plan to sewer the Mastic Peninsula. But, we must look at the bigger picture to secure the money available that
will allow us to complete Phases 3 and 4 without over-burdening to the local taxpayers. I am confident that the
Governor, Mayor Pontieri and I share the same concerns about water quality and we all recognize Patchogue
Village as a model of how economic growth and protecting the environment can go hand-in-hand. This is a
game changer for the future of Mastic and the Forge river.”

Mayor Pontieri said, “Supervisor Romaine and I stand together in support of the reallocation of the sewer
funding. In the Village of Patchogue, we are currently in the planning stages to sewer over 500 homes located in
environmentally sensitive areas along the Patchogue River and Great South Bay. This will give us the
opportunity to sewer additional homes as well as move ahead with upgrades and future expansion of our sewer
plant. Local economic growth is tied directly into our sewer infrastructure and it is imperative that we continue
to make improvements to our system. I ask the Governor to consider our request, so we can move ahead with
these projects.”

Councilman Panico said, “Brookhaven and Patchogue have always shared a common vision for a cleaner
environment and vibrant economy. We are partners in this effort and value our strong relationship.”
Councilman Neil Foley said, “The Supervisor and Mayor have a history of cooperation to help make the Town
and Village better places to live. I am in full support of their request to the Governor and I expect that he will
give it serious consideration.”

County Legislator Sunderman said, “We are so happy the sewer referendum was successful. This will allow for
economic development in our area as well improve our environment. This was a once in a life time opportunity
and I am very excited to be part of this accomplishment. I’ve already requested to explore the connection of the
Mastic Beach Business District into phases 1 and 2 and have already requested grant funding for phases 3 and 4.
We are looking forward to the start of this project in 2020 and more to come in the future. It would be a great
opportunity to receive additional funding for our already designed project which was earmarked for use in
Suffolk County.

Most Popular Topics

Editor Picks