Its Time to Fall Back! Tomorrow, Sunday November 4th Daylight Saving Time officially ends! 253

Tomorrow, Sunday, November 4, clocks will be turned back one hour, indicating the end of Daylight Saving Time (DST) for much of the country. Day Light Saving Time ends just as we start to notice the decrease in daylight hours.  The change shifts additional daylight back into the morning.  The time change doesn’t happen at midnight like some expect, instead it happens at 2 A.M. when most people are in bed. This was done to try to cause minimal disruption and confusion. By waiting until 2 A.M. to give or take an hour it prevents the date from switching.  It is also when the fewest trains are running, before most early shift workers leave for work, and most bars and restaurants are already closed.

DST has been widely accepted across the country, but it’s not mandated by federal law and is not observed nationwide.  If you really cant stand springing forward and falling back each year you may consider moving to Arizona who has opted out since 1968. Arizona summers are very hot, and an earlier sunset gives residents more time to enjoy tolerable temperatures before bed. Hawaii also opts out, given Hawaii’s latitude it doesn’t see a noticeable daylight hour difference between winter and summer months so extending daylight wouldn’t make much difference.

Where did this Daylight Saving Time originate?  Benjamin Franklin introduced the concept in 1784 after visiting Paris stating that longer daylight hours would save on candle use. The first documented written proposal for Daylight Savings Time was put forward by William Willett in 1907.  Willett argued that we were wasting important daylight by rising at the same time in the summer as we did throughout the winter months.  In 1916, Germany was first to adopt the idea to attempt to conserve coal during World War I, then Britain, along with many other European nations, followed suit. It wasn’t until 1918 that the time change spread to the U.S..  When the first time Daylight Saving was instituted year-round in the US, it was called “War Time”. Time zones were called “Eastern War Time”, “Central War Time”, and “Pacific War Time”.  After the surrender of Japan in mid-August 1945, the time zones were relabeled “Eastern Peace Time”, “Central Peace Time” and “Pacific Peace Time”.  Most countries, including the U.S., ceased official observation of the switch following wartime. Daylight Saving Time was re-introduced in the US in the beginning of 1974 to save energy.  At the time, the US was in the middle of a nationwide energy crisis and the government was looking for ways to reduce public consumption.

Even though Daylight Saving Time was implemented to save fuel, there is no actual evidence that DST reduces energy use.  While it’s true that changing the clocks can save residents money on lighting, the cost of heating and air conditioning tends to increase. That extra hour of daylight is only beneficial when people are willing to go outside to enjoy it. It’s probably fair to say that especially in today’s world, energy-wise, it’s pretty much a wash.

Daylight Saving Time has been a topic of debate in our country for decades not only because of its questionable effect on energy conservation, but also because of its impact on the agriculture, hospitality and retail industries as well as human health.

Most health professionals feel DST should be abolished or implemented year-round.  They feel the change is it is disruptive to our bodies, especially in the Spring when we “lose” and hour.  Studies show that the extra hour of sleep we lose by springing ahead can have an adverse impact on our overall health.  In the days after Daylight Saving Time starts, our biological clocks are a little bit off. One hour of lost sleep may sound insignificant, but small disruptions in our sleep patterns have been shown to dull our senses and diminish our mental capacity.  An increased risk of heart attack, stroke, and susceptibility to illness have all been linked to the change in time.

Many east coast residents believe that daylight saving time shift into the evening should be extended year-round. They believe the extension would positively impact our health, economy, social lives and community.  It’s interesting to think about.  How would our patterns change, if at all? The length of light we experience each day wouldn’t change; that’s determined by our location and the tilt of Earth. However, we would experience more light during times that better accommodate our modern lives.   If daylight saving were always in effect most people argue that we could enjoy after-work light hours— and there’s a strong believe that this after-work light is worth more to us than morning light. Children get more exercise when the sun is out later and can play outside in the evening.  Adults would engage in more leisure activities after work, meet a friend for drink or be encouraged to shop a little later.

What do you think?  If you had a choice would you prefer more light hours in the morning or evening?  Well regardless of your preference, as residents of Long Island, Daylight Saving Time will end tomorrow.  Time will be set back and you will be gaining an hour of sleep this weekend.  Don’t forget to check your clocks to be sure they “fall back” tomorrow!

FUN D.S.T. FACTS:

  • In 1930, Stalin adopted Daylight Saving Time for Soviet Union, but he forgot to “Fall Back” and it stayed this way for the next 60 years.
  • During the 1950s and 60s, each U.S. region could begin and end Daylight Saving Time whenever they wanted. Due to widespread chaos, Congress passed the Uniform Time act of 1966, which created a standard time.
  • In 1987, Chile delayed Daylight Saving Time to accommodate a visit from the Pope. Chile also delayed switching the time in 1990 for a presidential inauguration.
  • In September 1999, daylight saving time helped prevent a terrorist bombing. When West Bank terrorists failed to realize that Israel had switched back to standard time, their bombs exploded an hour too early—killing three terrorists instead of the intended victims.
  • In 2012, a guy in Ohio was arrested twice in one day, at the exact same time, due to Daylight Saving Time
  • DST costs the U.S. billions of dollars a year in disruptions to the airline and retail industry, TV ratings and the stock market
  • A 2014 a poll found that an increasing number of Americans do not think daylight savings is worth the hassle. In 2014 33% of Americans supported the time change, down from 45% the year before.
  • Researchers found a 2% decrease in SAT scores when the tests were administered after Daylight Saving Time.
  • Surfing the web for enjoyment during work hours, increases significantly the first Monday after Daylight Saving Time begins in the spring. Researchers attributed this increase to lack of sleep and thus lack of focus and motivation.
  • Globally, about one-quarter of people in approximately 70 countries around the world implement Daylight Saving Time, though different countries change their clocks at different times. The only major industrialized countries that do not observe DST are Japan, India, and China.
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Patchogue Welcomes Amulet Arts 394

We were thrilled to be a part of the Official Ribbon Cutting Ceremony and Grand Opening Celebration for Amulet Arts on June 8th.  You can tell as soon as you walk through the door that details are important to owners Michael Cappel and Mandolynne Hopkins.  Every inch of the newly opened shop is designed to create an inspiring experience.  It is truly a unique and elegant boutique.  A family owned and operated shop, with more than 30 years in the industry, Amulet Arts offers piercing, jewelry installation services, microblading and fine jewelry.  Proud members of The Association of Professional Piercers, their staff offers the most current, hygienic and professional services to their clients.  They are one of the most highly credentialed and certified piercing/body art studios in New York State.

Although concerned at first about how they might be received, Mr. Cappel got emotional yesterday when asked about their experience opening in Patchogue.  “I have to tell you that Patchogue welcomed us with open arms, and I could not be more grateful to you guys”.

In addition to body art, Amulet Arts also has an amazing gallery where artists are able to showcase their work.  We met two local artists, Mary Searles (@calicoqueen) and Christie Jones (@swellanchor), who both had several pieces of their work on display. and were thrilled with the space and opportunity Amulet provided.  Make sure to check out their instagram accounts for more of their work.

Scroll down to see highlights from yesterdays event, and visit Amulet Arts at their website or Facebook.

Suffolk Strawberry Festivals 94

Early June is strawberry season on Long Island. This weekend and next you can get out and celebrate one of Long Islands sweetest crops.  Grab friends and family and head out to enjoy one (or both) of these great Strawberry Festivals.

Strawberry Fair at Benner’s Farm — East Setauket
56 Gnarled Hollow Road
631-689-8172
THIS WEEKEND:  Saturday, June 8th and Sunday June 9th

Benner’s Farm is a private fifteen-acre family homestead, first farmed in the 1700’s.  Each year the farm provides thousands of people a sense of what it was like to live on a small farm in years past.  The Benner family has been farming organically since the late nineteen seventies and also raise a variety of farm animals for self-sufficient living. This weekend they will celebrate the strawberry by dipping them in chocolate, making them into ice cream, putting them on home-made Strawberry Shortcake, turning them into jam and eating them as they are!  Come out to enjoy wholesome family fun with old-fashioned games and live music.  They also have bunnies and chicks for the kiddies to hold, the big swing, craft and local vendors and a whole Farm to explore and discover!  The farm just announced that they have a new baby calf on the farm and now have three baby goats and a lamb to pet and feed.

 

Mattituck Lions Club Strawberry Festival — Mattituck
1175 Route 48
631-298-2222
Thursday, June 13th through Sunday, June 16th

On Father’s Day weekend, the peak of the strawberry harvest, the Mattituck Lions Club brings the community together for a special weekend of fun and purpose. Whether you’re here year-round, are a seasonal resident or are drawn here by the Festival, you’re in for a wonderful time.  Dig into the strawberry shortcake, sample the strawberries dipped in chocolate, try the strawberries any way you like them. Head over to the rest tent to enjoy live music. Then find out what is available for sale from arts and craft vendors. Cheer as the new Strawberry Queen is crowned. Experience the midway rides. Taste foods from around the world. The fun keeps going after the sun sets, so bring lawn chairs and enjoy the fireworks on Thursday, Friday and Saturday.  Much of the Festival fun is free, thanks to the efforts of many volunteers. When you do spend, you help the Mattituck Lions advance their year-round community service efforts. Admission is $6 per person 5 and older. Pay-one-price ride tickets are available for purchase online. Dads are admitted FREE on Father’ Day when accompanied by a paid child.

 

No need to be sour if  you are not able to make any of these festivals,  here you can find a list of Farms and Stands where you can get out and pick your own or purchase local Strawberries throughout the season.  

 

 

 

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